Posts Tagged ‘William H. Gray III 30th Street Station’

Bus Schedules Change in North Carolina; Buses Replace Trains to Atlantic City

October 22, 2020

Eastern North Carolina Thruway Service changed on Oct. 20 at certain cities with the changes in effect through Aug. 20, 2021.

In a service advisory, Amtrak said buses 6089 and 6090 are suspended while Buses 6189 and 6190 are canceled on Tuesdays.

Bus service is suspended at Goldsboro, Kinston, Havelock, Morehead City and Swansboro.

Bus service will continue at Wilmington, Jacksonville, New Bern, Greenville and Wilson.

In an unrelated development New Jersey Transit will substitute buses for trains on weekends between Philadelaphia (30th Street Station) and Atlantic City, New Jersey.

The bus substitutions will continue through Dec. 18 due to work on the Delair Bridge. The work will affect rail service between 4 a.m. on Saturdays and 6:30 p.m. on Sundays.

Passengers boarding at 30th Street station will board the bus on JFK Boulevard across from the station’s 30th Street entrance. The bus will depart at the scheduled train time.

Those traveling on a bus to 30th Street Station will disembark on  the driveway on the 30th Street side of the station right outside the doors.

Philly Station Project Gets Leader

June 23, 2020

Amtrak said it has selected the North American affiliate of Australia infrastructure investment firm the Plenary Group to lead the project to develop Philadelphia’s 30th Street Station.

The passenger carrier said the Plenary team, which also includes Gilbane Building Co. of Rhode Island, was chosen based on its proposal and it record of project delivery, extensive experience with complex mixed-use properties and adaptive reuse of historic buildings.

Officials are still talking about financial terms for the project, which is part of the 30th Street Station District Plan involving long-term redevelopment of 175 acres around the terminal.

More Station Waiting Rooms Closed

April 28, 2020

More Amtrak station waiting room closing and other adjustments have been made during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The waiting room in Independence, Missouri, has been closed until further notice.

Amtrak’s Missouri River Runner trains will continue to stop and passengers will have access to the boarding platforms.

In Philadelphia, the William H Gray, III 30th Street station has a reduced number of entrances and modified station hours

Acess to the station is limited to a single entrance in the 30th Street Portico, the SEPTA concourse from 30th street and through the parking garage.

The station will be closed between 1 a.m. and 5 a.m. to all non-Amtrak personnel while workers clean and disinfect the facility.

In California, changes have been made to station operations along the Pacific Surfliner corridor.

Closed stations include San Juan Capistrano and Solana Beach although trains will continue to stop there.

The Anaheim and Irvine station waiting areas are open, but the Amtrak ticket window is closed, until further notice.

Stations in San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Oxnard, Van Nuys, Los Angeles, Fullerton, Santa Ana, Oceanside and San Diego Downtown (Santa Fe Depot) are operating with modified hours.

Los Angeles Union Station is only open to ticketed passengers.

Philly Solari Board Now on Display in Museum

August 7, 2019

There was much made of the removal of the Solari board from Philadelphia’s William H. Gray III 30th Street Station back in January.

The iconic board, which provided arrival and departure times of Amtrak trains and made a pleasing noise as its flaps spun around each time it was updated, has since been taken to the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania.

At the time of its removal, a Philadelphia company, Oat Foundry, said it could build a modern, replacement flipboard that fulfilled ADA requirements, but Amtrak wasn’t interested.

Amtrak had cited the Solari board’s failure to adhere to ADA standards as one reason why it ws removed.

For the hearing impaired, the Solari board was unable to provide visual updates, which instead were provided by a public address system. That is not a problem with the new digital board that replaced the Solari board.

The passenger carrier also pointed to the board’s age and the difficulty of obtaining replacement parts.

The Solari board, which is named for its Italian manufacturer, was the last of its kind in the Amtrak network when it was turned off on Jan. 26.

Named after the Italian manufacturer that made it, the Solari board is, technically, on loan to the museum.

Amtrak has hired a developer to redesign 30th Street Station and working the Solari board into those plans are under consideration.

For now, the Solari board can be found in the Rolling Stock Hall on Platform 5 West next to a 114-year steam locomotive.

The museum has cleaned it and placed it on a base. In time, the museum plans to add a video screen to the exhibit that will show the Solar board in operation as well as explain its history.

Talks between Amtrak and the museum housing the Solari board there began in 2016, but languished until 2018.

Although the board arrived at the museum in February, it didn’t go on display until late July.

The Solari board will remain at the museum for at least the next three years.

Museum officials have said that if it can’t be incorporated into the 30th Street station redesign, they will be “honored” to keep the Solari board permanently.

Sign Placed Renaming 30th Street Station

July 5, 2019

Signs are going up noting that Philadelphia’s 30th Street Station has been renamed for the late William H. Gray III.

Gray, was a member of Congress from Philadelphia between 1979 and 1991.

The first sign at the station honoring Gray was installed on June 27 and a second will soon be placed.

A 2014 act of Congress renamed the facility as the William H Gray III 30th Street Station.

Plans also include the installation of  a statue of Gray and a memorial plaque.

Officials have not determined yet where those will be placed.

Gray, who was the first African American to chair the House Budget Committee and serve as majority whip, the third-ranking position in the House, died six years ago at age 71.

He helped raise millions of dollars to renovate 30th Street Station in the 1980s.