Posts Tagged ‘public transportation funding’

House Committee OKs Pandemic Aid for Amtrak

February 14, 2021

A congressional committee on Wednesday approved transportation funding for a COVID-19 relief bill.

The House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure approved a plan put forth by committee Democrats to provide $1.5 billion for Amtrak and $30 billion for public transit.

The committee also approved a policy rider directing Amtrak to restore without 90 days daily service for long-distance trains that operated daily before last fall.

The Amtrak funding had to survive two efforts by committee Republicans to eliminate it.

The committee defeated a motion by Rep. Scott Perry (R-Pennsylvania) to cut the Amtrak funding from the bill.

Another committee member, Rep. Rick Crawford (R-Arkansas) withdrew an amendment to transfer the Amtrak emergency funding to a highway-rail grade crossing program.

Crawford withdrew his amendment after Committee Chair Peter DeFazio (D-Oregon) agreed to work with Crawford on the grade crossing issue in the upcoming surface transportation reauthorization bill.

The bill now advances to the full House. The Senate is expected to consider a counterpart COVID-19 pandemic relief bill.

Amtrak funding as approved by the House committee would be broken down to $820,388,160 for the Northeast Corridor and $679,622,840 for the national network.

The bill directs that not less than $165,926,000 of the combined amounts of the NEC and national network is to be used to restore all long-distance service in effect as of July 1, 2020, and to recall all workers put on furlough on or after Oct. 1, 2020.

Another clause provides that not less than $109,805,000 from the combined amounts of the NEC and national network shall be used in lieu of capital payments that the state-supported routes and commuter authorities were required to pay.

Amtrak is to use $174,850,000 from the national network funds to offset amounts required to be paid by states for covered state-supported routes.

The $30 billion earmarked for public transit is to be used to prevent, prepare for, and respond to the coronavirus pandemic and includes eligibility for operating expenses to prevent layoffs and avoid cuts to service.

The legislation includes mandates for how the funding it to be allocated among urbanized areas, rural areas and for services for seniors and those with disabilities.

Some of the public transit emergency aid can also be used for planning purposes.

Transit Needs $232B in Infrastructure Investments

March 23, 2019

America’s public transportation systems need at least $232 billion in investments over the next 10 years in order to bring their infrastructure to a state of good repair, said the American Public Transportation Association.

APTA said it has discussed its findings with congressional staff members attending a legislative conference in Washington.

The study cited a number of sources, including a 2015 U.S. Department of Transportation infrastructure status report that concluded there is a $89.8-billion backlog of spending needed on state of good repair transit projects.

The report also included $51.2-billion in projects awaiting review for funding from the Federal Transit Administration’s Capital Investment Grant program.

Other data came from a survey of APTA members, 55 of which named 169 additional projects costing $91 billion.

Trump Budget Would Slash Transportation Funding

March 14, 2019

The Trump administration is seeking a cut of $5.1 billion to the budget of the U.S. Department of Transportation that would also include the elimination Amtrak’s long-distance trains.

The proposed fiscal year 2020 budget would cut DOT funding by 21.5 percent and make major cuts to Amtrak funding.

The passenger carrier would receive $1.49 billion, which is a 22 percent reduction from its fiscal year appropriation of $1.9 billion.

Northeast Corridor funding would be slashed from $650 million to $325.5 million and no funding is recommended for the Gateway Tunnel project in New York and New Jersey.

The budget proposes $550 million in “transitional funding” to help states pay for Amtrak corridor routes, including those not now in operation.

The budget envisions Amtrak contracting with bus operators to provide transportation to rural areas served by long-distance trains.

The budget contended that Amtrak inadequately serves rural areas while not serving many growing metropolitan areas.

The administration cited low ridership and large operating losses of long-distance routes as the driving force for restructuring the national intercity passenger rail system.

“The administration believes that restructuring the Amtrak system can result in better service (at a lower cost) by focusing trains on shorter distance (less than 750 miles) routes, while providing robust intercity bus service to currently underserved rural areas via a partnership between Amtrak and bus operators,” the budget states.

Much of the thrust of the budget is to transfer funding of transportation from the federal government to state governments.

“The 2020 Budget  . . .  recognizes that the federal government is not — and should not be — the primary funder of the nation’s transportation systems,” the budget document said.

The American Public Transportation Association said the budget would fund public transportation at $12.4 billion, a cut of $998 million from the FY2019 enacted level of $13.4 billion.

Most of that decrease comes from cuts in the Capital Investment Grants program, a discretionary and competitive federal grant program that funds projects for light, heavy and commuter rail, as well as streetcars and bus rapid transit services.

The administration proposes spending $1.5 billion for CIG programs, a cut of $1 billion from current funding levels.

The CIG program funding recommendation would make $500 million available for new CIG projects.

However, the budget would fully funds Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act programs authorized from the Highway Trust Fund.

It also would double funding for INFRA grants to $2 billion. These can be used for ports, intermodal, or rail projects including grade crossing separations, in addition to highway projects.

The Better Utilizing Investments to Leverage Development program would receive $1 billion, a $100 million increase.

The budget contains $200 billion for “other infrastructure projects,” but those are described as “visionary projects” such as 5G cellular communications and artificial intelligence.

Poll Finds 74% Favor More Transit Aid

July 25, 2018

A large majority of Americans believe that Congress should increase public transit funding, the American Public Transportation Association said this week.

A poll conducted for APTA by the Mineta Transportation Institution found 74 percent of respondents favored increased federal transit funding and 80 percent support using tax dollars for creating, expanding and improving public transportation in their communities.

The poll also found 80 percent of respondents said public transit is important to communities because it “helps businesses flourish.”

The survey collected data from 1,201 interviews with individuals across the United States.

Public Transportation, Amtrak do Well in Budget Bill

May 3, 2017

A proposed federal budget for the remainder of fiscal year 2017 contains funding for public transportation and Amtrak, the American Public Transportation Association reported.

Congress is expected to vote on the budge this week to fund the federal government through Sept. 30.

The FY17 omnibus appropriations bill contains $12.4 billion in funding for the Federal Transit Administration, $657 million above the FY 2016 enacted level.

The transit formula grants total is $9.7 million while about $2.4 billion would go toward “New Starts” funding, including $1.5 billion for current Full Funding Grant Agreement transit projects.

Amtrak would receive a $75 million increase to $1.495 billion.

Also included in the bill is $199 million for positive train control funding authorized under the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act.

The Consolidated Rail Infrastructure and Safety Improvements grant program would receive $68 million; the Federal-State Partnership for State of Good Repair grant program would get $25 million; the Restoration and Enhancement Grants would get $5 million; and the Transit Security Grant program, $88 million.

The Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery grant program would be funded at $500 million.