Posts Tagged ‘private passenger cars’

Amtrak Won’t Handle Private Car Moves at WUS

April 21, 2019

Amtrak is citing construction work at Washington Union Station in refusing requests to allow private passenger cars to use the facility for layover and switching.

The passenger carrier has denied requests for some trips that were to originate in Washington.

In particular, Amtrak said work on rebuilding the station concourse will restrict its ability to accommodate private cars there.

The work involves rebuilding the concourse to increase passenger capacity and provide new amenities.

Over the next 20 years Amtrak will seek to double the station’s train capacity.

Amtrak has told private car owners that their cars may no longer be switched onto or off of almost all trains in Washington. The carrier has also banned parking of private cars in the terminal. This situation is expected to last for up to two years.

Although Amtrak said it couldn’t say how many private rail car trips were affected, the Washington Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society has said it has been forced to cancel three trips involving its car Dover Harbor.

Amtrak to Increase Private Car Fees Again

November 5, 2018

Amtrak has told private car owners that it plans to increase various fees that it charges them to haul and store their cars effective Jan. 1, 2019.

The increases are part of another round of rule changes being implemented by the passenger carrier.

It is the second time in the past eight months that Amtrak has increased its private-car tariffs.

The new rate will become $3.67 per mile, an increase of more than 12 percent from the $3.26 fee imposed on May 1, 2018.

In the past year, Amtrak has increased the cost of hauling a private car 77 cents per mile for an increase of 26 percent.
Overnight parking rates will become $174 per night. They had been $155.

The monthly parking rate at Amtrak terminals will increase to $3,516 per month, up from $3,125.

If another locomotive is added to a train that has added private cars that fee will increase to $5.74 per mile. The previous rate had been $5.10 per mile.

Other charges that Amtrak is imposing include daily locomotive charge of $1,970 and a head end power daily charge of $2,692.

Further, Amtrak said it “reserves the right to change the terms and rates contained herein at any time.”

The carrier did agree to honor the rates contained in a confirmation agreed to before any rate increases go into effect.

In a win for private car owners, Amtrak has restoring Oakland, California, as a connecting point at which cars can connect between the Coast Starlight and the California Zephyr. Making that connection will cost $2,065 per occurrence.

The rule changes slated to go into effect includes a clause that private car owners or the person in charge of a private car shall not offer business courtesies to any Amtrak employee.

This includes such things as “presents, gifts, hospitality, or favor for which fair market value is not paid by the recipient.”

The rules also cite meals, drinks, entertainment, door prizes, and transportation as examples of business courtesies, among any gifts or services with a value greater than $10.

The new guidelines also contain additional details regarding professional conduct, inspection and repair guidelines, and insurance and liability requirements.

Amtrak Won’t Allow Being on Open Platform Cars

June 11, 2018

Amtrak has revised its safety manual for private rail car owners to prohibit passengers aboard open platform cars from riding or standing on the platform while the car is in motion.

The manual said the rule applies to cars attached to any Amtrak revenue train or charter operation.

“Failure to adhere to this safety rule could result in the private car owner being suspended or revoked from operation on any Amtrak train or charter train,” the rules states.

A related rule requires that vestibule doors and windows shall be closed and latched before a train departs and remain closed until it comes to a halt at the next station.

The safety manual is a 15-page documents that spells out in detail Amtrak’s rules and expectations for private car owners and their passengers.

The manual also notes that starting on May 14, 2018, the procedure for scheduling the annual, 40 Year, and 10 year follow-up inspections is now being managed Amtrak’s Centralized National Operations Center.

Amtrak’s mechanical maintenance facilities are no longer available to perform these periodic inspections.

Amtrak Policy Change Has Private Car Owners Scrambling

March 30, 2018

Amtrak’s recent decision to cease running charter trains and specials as well as to curtail carriage of privately-owned passenger cars on its trains has sent a trade organization scrambling to rally its members to seek to apply political pressure on the passenger carrier to reverse the decision.

The American Association of Private Railroad Car Owners sent a memorandum to its members this week urging them to contact lawmakers and opinion leaders about the significance of private cars but acknowledged that there is little it can do to attack Amtrak’s decision in court.

AAPRCO told its members in the memo that it is “working to get the most accurate information about the full extent of Amtrak’s policy, which may not yet be firmly in place, and to mount the strongest possible effort to push back against it.”

In the meantime, Amtrak’s decision has prompted the Fort Wayne Railroad Historical Society to delay selling tickets for a planned trip in Chicago in September behind its 2-8-4 Nickel Plate Road No. 765.

The steam locomotive is to pull excursions between Chicago and Joliet, Illinois, on track owned by commuter railroad Metra.

However, the Fort Wayne group relies on privately-owned cars that would use Amtrak trains and facilities to reach Chicago.

Several private car owners have reported in recent weeks that Amtrak has rejected some of their requests to move their cars.

Amtrak’s new policy pertaining to the carriage of private passenger cars will prohibit attaching and detaching those cars to Amtrak trains at points where an Amtrak train is scheduled to dwell for less than 30 minutes.

However, the carrier has yet to spell out in detail how it will handle private cars going forward.

“At this time, we feel it would be imprudent to open ticket sales as previously scheduled before we have more clarity on the situation,” said a Fort Wayne Society news release. “As such, this policy will force us to revisit our contractual agreements with car owners, re-confirm both their availability and costs, and confirm Amtrak’s ability to transport them to our venue. Amtrak’s participation was critical to last year’s Joliet Rocket trips.”

It is not know yet if these development will affect a planned visit of the NKP 765 to the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad in late September.

For those excursions, the FtWRHS uses CVSR’s own passenger fleet and does not need to bring in private passenger cars.

As for Amtrak’s policy change pertaining to charter trains and special trains, AAPRCO President Robert Donnelley told his members that the association’s annual convention and mid-year special trains are at risk.

“Amtrak’s stated rationale for these changes is that private varnish has the potential to worsen on-time performance, which is a major concern of President and CEO Richard Anderson,” Donnelley wrote. However, he took issue with that.

Another private car owner trade group, the Railroad Passenger Car Alliance said it has contacted Amtrak to express its concerns but it also has told its members that the implications of the Amtrak policy change are ominous.

“The policy as officially released on March 28, 2018, will have drastic effects on many private car owners, excursion operators, private companies, and tourism in many communities that utilize Amtrak’s service,” RPCA President W. Roger Fuehring told Trains magazine.

“As we move forward, we hope to have an open dialogue with Amtrak in regards to discussing this policy. We look forward to returning not only the revenue stream to Amtrak that we produce with our clientele, but the goodwill that we generate on behalf of Amtrak with every trip.”

One point of contention in talks with Amtrak and the private car owners will be how much revenue the national passenger carrier receives from fees charged to handle the cars.

AAPRCO contends that the private car business adds $10 million in gross revenues to Amtrak, but a recent Wall Street Journal article said it was $4 million.

The memo written by Amtrak President Anderson and sent to employees that announced the ban on most special moves and charters suggested that Amtrak has not been recovering its fully allocated costs for those trains and that they have become a distraction.

AAPRCO’s Donnelley has instructed his group’s members to talk up the importance of private passenger cars and the number of jobs associated with the industry.

His memo said this would include employment at shops and other vendor facilities that support private passenger cars.

The railroad preservation community has launched an online petition to protest Amtrak’s decision at the website change.org. The petition has received more than 450 signatures with a goal of 500.

Amtrak Special Rolls Through Cleveland

October 11, 2016

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On Sunday, Oct. 2, a seven-car American Association of Private Railroad Car Owners special went west through Cleveland.

The special consisted of Amtrak P42DC’s 134 and 190; Pennsylvania 120; Juniata Terminal’s Warrior Ridge; Morristown and Erie’s Alexander Hamilton; former New York Central 43, Mount Vernon; former Pullman Pacific Home; and former NYC Babbling Brook.

I caught the special going through Berea and thought it looked somewhat like the Great Steel Fleet that the New York Central ran in the postwar era.

I probably should have gone to a more representative location such as Olmsted Falls with the depot but sometimes you take what you can get.

Article and Photographs by Todd Dillon

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