Posts Tagged ‘Federal transportation bill’

House Budget Bill Boosts Transportation Spending

July 19, 2021

The House Appropriations Committee last week approved a spending bill for fiscal year 2022 that would boost spending on transportation programs over FY2021 levels.

The bill, known as the Transportation, and Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies legislation provides an increase of $1.9 billion for the U.S. Department of Transportation.

USDOT is allocated $105.7 billion in budgetary resources, a 22 percent increase above the FY2021 enacted level ($86.7 billion) and President Joseph Biden’s FY2022 budget request of $87 billion.

Among the spending levels authorized for transportation programs are:

• $1.2 billion for National Infrastructure Investments, a 20 percent increase from FY 2021. It includes $20 million for Transportation Planning Grants to assist areas of persistent poverty, a 100 percent increase over FY 2021. An additional $100 million is included for a new grant program to “spur thriving communities nationwide.”

•$4.1 billion for the Federal Railroad Administration, up 46 percent from FY 2021. This includes $625 million for the new Passenger Rail Improvement, Modernization, and Expansion (PRIME) grant program “to support projects that improve, expand or establish passenger rail service”; $500 million for the Consolidated Rail Infrastructure and Safety Improvements (CRISI) grant program, a 33 percent increase from FY 2021; $2.7 billion for Amtrak, a 35 percent boost over FY 2021, which includes $1.2 billion for Northeast Corridor Grants and $1.5 billion for National Network Grants.

• $15.5 billion for the Federal Transit Administration, including $12.2 billion for Transit Formula Grants to expand bus fleets and increase the transit state of good repair; $2.5 billion for Capital Investment Grants to construct more than 23 new transit routes nationwide, a 22 percent increase above the FY 2021 enacted level and equal to the president’s budget request; and $580 million for Transit Infrastructure Grants to purchase more than 300 zero-emission buses and 400 diesel buses, and to support “transformative research for transit systems,” which is a 12 percent increase above FY 2021.

Federal Transportation Bill Wins Congressional OK

December 4, 2015

The $305 billion federal transportation bill won widespread approval in the House and Senate on Thursday and was expected to be signed by President Obama.

The legislation is an authorization of spending and actual spending measures must still be approved by the next Congress.

The 1,300-page bill authorizes $281 billion through the Highway Trust Fund and $24 billion through annual appropriations.

The bill increases highway spending by 15 percent by its final year and transit spending by 18 percent.

This includes $12 billion for mass transit, $10 billion for Amtrak and $1 billion for National Highway Traffic Safety Administration programs.

The bill was approved 359-65 in the House and 83-16 in the Senate.

The legislation includes policy provisions related to highway safety, railroads and road programs.

One provision changes a federal law limiting how much railroads can be forced to pay those hurt and families of those killed in rail accidents. The liability cap would increase to $295 million, up from $200 million.

The bill also includes $199 million to help commuter railroads install positive train control

Commuter railroads have said they have been unable to install PTC systems thus far due to tight budgets.

The money in the bill marks the first time the federal government has set money aside for PTC installation. However, that funding is a fraction of the expected total cost of $12 billion to install PTC.

Passenger railroads will be required to install inward-facing cameras to monitor crews.

Amtrak’s Northeast Corridor’s budget will be split from that of its national network. The two would receive $2.6 billion and $5.5 billion respectively.

Congress chose not to increase the federal gas tax, which is now 18.4 cents per gallon.

It instead elected to take $19 billion from the Federal Reserve’s surplus funds and lower the dividend payments large banks receive from the Fed from 6 percent to 1.5 percent.

Another revenue source will come from private tax collection services being used to collect back payments on federal taxes under the legislation.

The bill authorizes the federal government to revoke the passports of those owing more than $50,000 in back taxes to the IRS.

The bill authorizes transportation spending for five years. The last time Congress passed a transportation funding bill lasting more than two years was in 2005.

Transportation Groups Generally Pleased With Proposed Federal Transportation Funding Bill

December 2, 2015

The five-year federal transportation bill that is before Congress affects the railroad industry by strengthening tank-car safety standards, increases funding for transit systems and creates a rail title that authorizes funding for Amtrak and intercity passenger-rail grants.

Known as the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation, the authorizes $305 billion for transportation programs.

Railroad and public transportation trade organizations are still reviewing the legislation, which was agreed upon by a House and Senate conference committee on Tuesday, but initial reactions to the bill are positive.

“As the first long-term surface transportation bill in 10 years, the significance of this legislation cannot be overstated,” said American Public Transportation Association  President and Chief Executive Officer Michael Melaniphy. “A well-funded, long-term surface transportation authorization is critical to the economic competitiveness and prosperity of our nation’s communities.”

Jim Matthews, president of the National Association of Railroad Passengers, called the FAST Act a step in the right direction.

“We’ve gone from the House voting on whether to completely eliminate funding to Amtrak in the spring, to the full Congress thinking seriously and thoughtfully about how to improve and expand the passenger rail network in a single calendar year; that is a big achievement for America’s 31 million passengers,” he said.

Association of American Railroads President and CEO Ed Hamberger hailed the bill’s action on  tank-car standards.

In a statement, the AAR also welcomed a provision that streamlines the environmental permitting process for rail infrastructure projects based on previously enacted reforms for highway and transit projects.

Hamberger said these reforms are designed to increase capacity, improve safety, hire new employees and provide more efficient service.

The bill authorizes $61.1 billion over five years for public transportation, according to APTA. Overall, transit funding would increase by more than 10 percent in one year and by almost 18 percent over the five-year bill.

The bill also would provide $199 million in one-time funding for commuter railroads to implement positive train control technology and authorizes $200 million, rising to $650 million in 2020, for three separate rail infrastructure programs.

The current federal surface transportation authorization expires on Dec. 4 and a short-term extension may be needed to give the House and Senate time to approve the final bill.

As for the tank car standards, the bill increases the thermal blanket protection for tank cars and restrictions on the use of older DOT-111 tank cars that move flammable liquids.

The bill also includes a requirement for top fittings protection on tank car retrofits, which addressed what the rail industry said was a shortcoming in the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration’s tank car rule enacted in May.

Other railroad elements in the bill include:
• Amtrak funding under a new Northeast Corridor account and a separate National Network program, with total funding for both programs set at $1.45 billion in 2016, rising to $1.8 billion by 2020. Competitors will be allowed to operate up to three Amtrak long-distance lines if they could do so at less cost to taxpayers.
• Accelerates the delivery of rail projects by reforming the environmental and historic preservation review processes, applying existing exemptions already used for highways to make critical rail investments go further.

  • Establishes limited authorization with guaranteed funding for grants or loans to commuter railroads and States that can leverage $2 billion in financing for positive train control implementation.
  • Preserves the U.S. Department of Transportation’s final rule requiring ECP brakes on certain trains by 2021 and 2023, while requiring an independent evaluation and real-world derailment test. DOT must evaluate its final rule within the next two years using the results of the evaluation and testing.
  • Increases the passenger rail liability cap to $295 million by adjusting the current $200 million cap for inflation. The provision will be applied to the Amtrak derailment in Philadelphia on May 12, 2015, and adjusts the cap for inflation every five years.
  • Requires passenger railroads to install inward-facing cameras to monitor train crews and outward-facing cameras to monitor track conditions at the time of an accident or incident.
  • Closes a potential loophole in DOT regulations and reduces the risk of thermal tears, which is when a pool fire causes a tank car to rupture and potentially result in greater damage.
  • Improves emergency response by requiring railroads to provide accurate, real-time, and electronic train consist information to first responders on the scene of an accident.
  • Increases safety at highway-rail crossings by requiring action plans to improve engineering, education, and enforcement, evaluating the use of locomotive horns and quiet zones, and examining methods to address blocked crossings.
  • Enhances passenger rail safety by requiring speed limit action plans, redundant signal protection, alerters, and other measures to reduce the risk of over-speed derailments and worker fatalities.
  • Creates a working group and rail restoration program to explore options for resuming service discontinued after Hurricane Katrina.
  • Reforms the $35 billion Railroad Rehabilitation and Improvement Financing Program to increase transparency and flexibility, expand access for limited option freight rail shippers, and provide tools to reduce taxpayer risks.

NARP broke down the authorizing funding for Amtrak and select other rail programs as follows:

  •  Northeast Corridor, $2.596 billion.
  • National network, $5.454 billion.
  • Gulf Coast Working Group, $500,000.
  • Consolidated rail infrastructure and safety improvement, $1.103 billion.
  • Federal-state partnership for state of good repair, $997 million over five years.
  • Restoration and enhancement grants, $100 million.
  • Amtrak Office of Inspector General, $105 million.
  • Authorization of grants for positive train control, $199 million.

The bill boosts highway spending by 15 percent and transit spending by 18 percent while authorizing $10 billion over five years for Amtrak, $12 billion for mass transit and $1 billion for vehicle safety programs.

However, those funding numbers are subject to annual spending decisions by Congress.

Transportation Bill Requires Amtrak to Make Separate NEC Budget, Allow Pets on Trains

December 1, 2015

A compromise $305 billion federal transportation bill was agreed upon by House and Senate negotiators on Tuesday that contains a number of railroad-related measures.

The bill directs Amtrak to separate the budget for the Northeast Corridor from the rest of the railroad’s network budget and to establish a pilot program to allow passengers to bring a dog or cat aboard in much the same manner as carry-on luggage.

The legislation will fund highway and mass-transit projects for the next five years. It also contains a proviso that establishes a grant program for large freight projects.

The bill still needs to win approval from the House and Senate.

The two chambers earlier approved a stop-gap measure that extended the authority for transportation spending through Dec. 4.

In the event that the compromise bill encounters difficulties in either chamber, Congressional leaders have readied another temporary extension of transportation funding authority.

Supporters of the requirement that Amtrak break out a separate budget for the Northeast Corridor say that this will allow the railroad to invest more in the heavily traveled route between Boston and Washington, D.C.

They say that revenue from the NEC has been supporting the nationwide network, which Amtrak says loses money.

News accounts reported that the transportation bill does not name a revenue source for the Highway Trust Fund, whose revenue has eroded due to falling gasoline tax receipts prompted by more fuel-efficient vehicles.

Analysts said the pending transportation funding bill moves Congress further away from the principle that users of transportation systems should pay for their projects, a development that is expected to draw fire from some conservative groups.

Greg Cohen, president and chief executive of the American Highway Users Alliance, said he was troubled by the use of revenue from sources other than user taxes and fees.

“This program traditionally has been a user-pay program,” he said. “But the revenue coming in has not kept pace with inflation and with the cost of construction. So they found something . . .  but it is not a sustainable plan going forward.”

Among the steps that lawmakers are proposing taking to help pay for transportation spending are selling oil from the nation’s emergency stockpile, taking money from a Federal Reserve surplus account and reducing the dividend paid to banks with assets of at least $10 billion.

The bill also proposes to raise money by hiring outside debt collectors to collect unpaid taxes, to raise the fees paid by travelers who go through customs, and paying into the Highway Trust Fund the fines collected for motor-vehicle safety violations.

As for the pilot program to allow pets on board trains, the legislation mandates Amtrak to dedicate at least one car per train “in which a ticketed passenger may transport a domesticated cat or dog in the same manner as a carry-on baggage.”

The animals must be carried in a pet kennel that conforms with Amtrak regulations for carry-on bags. Passengers with pets will also have to pay a fee.

Supporters of the pets aboard the train program said that “no federal funds may be used to implement the pilot program.”

A year after implementing the program, Amtrak is to report to Congress on how the program played out.