Posts Tagged ‘Amtrak ridership’

Amtrak Lost $801M in FY2020

November 24, 2020

Amtrak warned yet again on Monday that further service cuts are possible unless Congress increases its federal funding for the passenger carrier in fiscal year 2021.

Funding for Amtrak and other federally-funded programs is currently being provided under a continuing resolution approved by Congress in late September that expires on Dec. 11.

That resolution calls for interim funding in FY2021 to be at the same levels as FY2020, which ended on Sept. 30.

“If the current level of funding is extended in a continuing resolution beyond Dec. 11 . . . and supplemental funding isn’t provided we’re going to be unable to avoid taking fairly difficult actions that could have long-lasting effects on our Northeast Corridor infrastructure and the national rail system,” said Amtrak CEO William Flynn.

Flynn said the carrier needs additional emergency funding for the remainder of the fiscal year.

If Amtrak funding continues at its current levels, Flynn said as many as 1,600 workers operating state-supported trains could be furloughed.

Amtrak Senior Executive Vice President Stephen Gardner said decisions on job and service cuts will be made based on how long the uncertainty remains.

In a news release, Amtrak said during FY2020 its operating revenue, including payments from state-supported routes, decreased 31.9 percent to $2.3 billion when compared with FY 2019.

Ticket revenue was down $1.24 billion or 47.3 percent.

During FY2020 Amtrak posted an unaudited operating loss of $801.1 million, which it attributed largely to lost ridership during the pandemic.

The carrier also reported advancing $1.9 billion in infrastructure and fleet work.

Amtrak Board Chairman Anthony Coscia said the passenger carrier projects that under current trends and future projections, ridership and revenue are expected to be down 63 percent by the end of fiscal 2021.

That would be worse than the 50 percent decline Amtrak management had predicted earlier when it announced its plans to reduce the operating frequency of most long-distance trains to tri-weekly.

Coscia said Amtrak intends to move forward on $2 billion in critical infrastructure work “that includes safety and reliability measures that we believe will permit the company to come through the pandemic with a railroad that was playing and will play in the nation’s economic recovery.”

He said Amtrak has more than $5 billion of additional investments that could contribute to recovery following the pandemic.

Amtrak said it provided 16.8 million customer trips in FY 2020, down 47.4 percent with a year-over-year decline of 15.2 million riders.

In recent months, ridership has dipped by 20 to 25 percent of pre-COVID levels.

Amtrak Predicts 72% Ridership Drop in FY2021

October 22, 2020

Amtrak now expects ridership in federal fiscal year 2021 to be 72 percent below what it was in FY 2019.

Speaking before the Senate Commerce Committee, Amtrak CEO William Flynn said the passenger carrier expects to carry 9 million passengers in the current fiscal year. In FY 2019 Amtrak handled 32.5 million passengers.

In earlier statements, Flynn had projected the carrier would handle just half of its normal ridership in FY 2021.

Even the more pessimistic ridership numbers that Flynn presented this week are based on the assumption that by mid 2021 there will be an effective and widely distributed vaccine for the COVID-19 virus.

He acknowledged that this scenario “is not a guaranteed outcome.”

Amtrak and other public carriers, including airlines, have attributed massive ridership plunges to the COVID-19 pandemic depressing the market for travel, particularly business travel.

Flynn testified that in April daily ridership nosedived to 4,000 daily riders. This week it had rebounded to 17,000 per day, but before the pandemic it had been 80,000 per day.

Amtrak has said that preliminary figures show that in FY 2020 ridership has fallen by 97 percent and revenue by 53 percent.

Flynn said Amtrak revenue under the 9 million passengers for FY 2021 scenario would be $598 million. In FY 2019 Amtrak earned $2.4 billion.

He implored the committee to support granting Amtrak $2.8 billion in emergency aid by December.

Otherwise, Flynn said, Amtrak will have to delay capital projects and cut 2,400 more jobs.

Amtrak also has asked Congress to grant it $4.9 billion in FY 2021. The carrier had asked back in February for $2 billion for the 2021 budget year, which runs from Oct. 1 to Sept. 30.

Earlier this month Amtrak scaled back operation of all long-distance trains except the Auto Train to three times a week and furloughed 2,000 workers or about 10 percent of its workforce.

Flynn sought to frame those service reductions and staff furloughs as necessary to avoid deficit spending of up to $250 million a month in cash.

“At this rate of cash depletion, Amtrak would be forced to take even more drastic measures with long-lasting impacts on our company, our employees, and our network,” Flynn said.

Noting that emergency aid and additional appropriations from Congress has not been forthcoming, Flynn told the committee, “We must be prudent and address the situation at hand.”

Congress granted Amtrak $1 billion in emergency aid in March as part of the CARES Act, but Flynn said most of that money has since been spent and without additional assistance Amtrak faces the prospect of being forced into bankruptcy.

Some committee members expressed sharp criticism about Amtrak’s reducing the service levels of its long-distance trains.

 “Part of the skepticism that occurs at least with me, and maybe my colleagues, is that previous CEOs of Amtrak were less committed to long-distance passenger service,” said Senator Jerry Moran (R-Kansas).

 “So when the three-day [operation] arrives it raises concerns that this is another circumstance in which we’re just being played, that this is the continued effort to eliminate or significantly diminish the service.”

Committee Chairman Roger Wicker, R-Mississippi., noted that Amtrak’s “temporary suspension” of The Sunset Limited along the Gulf Coast has lasted 15 years.

Nos. 1 and 2 were suspended between New Orleans and Orlando in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

Senator Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-Washington) said, “We don’t want to see what the chairman’s talking about — some incident that basically sets a course where service is curtailed and then it takes you 15 years to get it re-established.”

Senator Jon Tester (D-Montana) expressed concern that in the absence of daily train service the public would choose other travel modes and may not return to Amtrak when full service is restored.

Flynn insisted, as he did in a House committee hearing in September, that Amtrak had no intention of making the service reductions permanent.

He said Amtrak would evaluate ridership and finances in February and might begin to restore daily service in May “when financially possible.”

Amtrak is not the only transportation-related agency seeking emergency funding from Congress.

Public transit agencies have asked for $36 billion, privately-owned school bus and motorcoach companies want $15 billion, airports are seeking $10 billion, and airlines have requested $25 billion.

Amtrak Execs Defend Move to Tri-Weekly Trains

August 18, 2020

Amtrak management is not counting on Congress to direct it to continue operating its long-distance trains on daily schedules this fall and winter but will maintain the status quo if so directed by lawmakers.

In an interview with Trains magazine, Amtrak President William Flynn and Senior Executive Vice President Stephen Gardner said the carrier has not developed contingency plans to operate its long-distance trains daily after October when it will be implementing tri-weekly service on all routes except the Auto Train.

“I don’t envision a situation where Congress is giving us something above the $3.5 billion,” Gardner said, “And they are not being fairly clear about what they expect in terms of operating levels.”

He was referring in part to Amtrak’s request for $1.475 billion in supplemental funding on top of the carrier’s $2.04 billion budget request for federal fiscal year 2021, which begins Oct. 1.

The House has approved $10 billion in funding for Amtrak in FY2021 along with a mandate to continue daily service on all routes that have it now.

However, the Senate has yet to act on the FY2021 appropriations bills. The Rail Passengers Association reported last week that Congressional hearings on Amtrak funding may be held in September.

“If Congress directs us to operate a seven-day service we will,” Flynn said.

But he warned that if Congress doesn’t provide suitable funding Amtrak will “have to make additional cuts to the workforce, and it would certainly affect our capital plans and suggest reductions on the Northeast Corridor and perhaps elsewhere on the national network.”

Flynn said Amtrak has not developed contingency plans for operating a daily long-distance network past October.

During the interview, both Amtrak executives defended the move to tri-weekly service with Gardner saying the situation this year is quite different than it was in 1995 when Amtrak reduced the operation of several, but not all, long-distance trains to tri- and quad-weekly after a consulting firm recommended that as a way to save money during a budget crunch.

A Government Accounting Office report later noted that the projected savings largely failed to materialize as expected because some costs did not fall as much as expected.

“We feel good about being able to save significant dollars for a limited period, and that makes sense because demand is so low,” Gardner said.

Amtrak has projected that operating long-distance trains at tri-weekly levels will yield a savings of $150 million.

Gardner, who serves as Amtrak’s chief operating and commercial officer, acknowledged that tri-weekly operation of trains is not ideal.

“Three days per week is not a good solution in a normal revenue environment [but] we’ve done our homework,” he said.

Trains also reported on Monday that earlier versions of the metrics Amtrak said it will use to determine when to return long-distance trains to daily operation were rejected by Capitol Hill staffers.

The staffers apparently proposed using metrics including airport bookings along long-distance routes and system-wide percentage drops in ridership since April.

Those suggestions also sought to chart long-distance ridership from October to May, something the Trains report said would overlook the strength of holiday-period travel.

Amtrak revenue in July was down 82 percent when compared with July 2019.

The 15 long-distance trains contributed 54 percent of the ticket revenue and long-distance trains income was down 61 percent when compared to July 2019.

Northeast Corridor revenue was down 93 percent and state-supported revenue was off 83 percent.

In the meantime, Amtrak has ceased selling sleeping car space starting Oct. 5 on the days that long-distance trains will not operate.

A statement issued by Amtrak on Monday said the carrier hopes to restore some or all long-distance service to daily operation in 2021, but that will hinge on adequate federal funding in FY2021 and at this point it is unclear how much money Amtrak will receive.

Amtrak Releases Criteria for Service Restorations

August 12, 2020

The long-awaited criteria that Amtrak said it will use to determine when tri-weekly long distance passenger trains will be restored to daily operation was released on Tuesday.

In a statement posted on its website, Amtrak said it will use three metrics.

COVID-19 hospitalizations must be stable or declining as of Feb. 15, 2021.

Advance bookings for June 2021 must be at least 90 percent of the available seat-miles or room-miles of the figure for June 2020, as of Feb. 15, 2020.

This will take into account limits on ticket sales to promote social distancing, as well as other COVID-related measures.

Ridership in the first quarter of fiscal year 2021, which begins on Oct. 1, must be at least 90 percent of projections in Amtrak’s 2021 operating plan.

All three of the criteria must be met for a given route to be restored to daily level of service.

Amtrak said the earliest that daily service restoration will occur is next May and the latest date is June 30, 2021.

The statement said Amtrak’s goal is that all long-distance service will be restored by that date provided that the U.S. and Amtrak are “healthy, consistent with restoration metrics, and sufficient funding assistance is provided by Congress.”

Amtrak indicated sufficient federal funding would be at least $3.5 billion for FY2021.

The passenger carrier said earlier this year that effective Oct. 1 it would reduce the frequency of operation of all long-distance trains to tri-weekly.

The exceptions include the Silver Meteor (New York-Miami), which will operate quad-weekly, and the Auto Train, which will continue to operate daily.

Amtrak has said that it is making the service cuts because it expects ridership in the coming fiscal year to be only half of what it was in FY2019, the last full fiscal year before the pandemic began in March 2020.

The Amtrak statement said ridership of its long-distance trains fell by 81 percent in March and April combined.

Although Amtrak has yet to release schedule information for tri-weekly operation, it did say in the statement that it will seek to preserve “timely” connections in Chicago for long-distance travelers.

“The thrice-weekly schedules are being designed to preserve a high percentage of the existing connecting opportunities on the days that trains will operate,” the statement said.

Passengers who already hold reservations for same-day Chicago connections that will be broken by the new tri-weekly schedules will be notified in advance of travel and given the option of canceling their reservations and receiving a full refund.

The statement said, though, that passengers whose connections are taken away on their existing itinerary will also be offered a new itinerary with “valid connections.”

Flynn Expects Job Cuts, Tri-Weekly Trains

August 12, 2020

Amtrak expects to furlough employees in fiscal year 2021 and expects long-distance trains to operate twi-weekly its president told Progressive Railroading magazine in an interview.

William Flynn

The job cuts and reduced service are likely because the carrier expects ridership to continue lagging into 2021.

William Flynn, who took over as Amtrak’s CEO on April 15, said ridership is now 18 percent of what it was in fiscal year 2019.

He said ridership rose between late May and early July, but has since hit a plateau due to outbreaks of COVID-19 in some parts of the country.

Although Flynn did not elaborate on how many workers might lose their jobs, he said the carrier has yet to furlough anyone in the current fiscal year, which extends through Sept. 30.

Flynn spoke in the interview as though the move to tri-weekly service by all of Amtrak’s long distance trains except the Auto Train on Oct. 1 will occur.

An FY2021 budget approved by the U.S. House of Representatives contains funding for daily service of those trains and a mandate to Amtrak not to furlough employees.

The Senate has yet to act on its own FY2021 budget proposals and the fate of the House budget proposal is uncertain.

During the interview, Flynn did not address the congressional action and continued to defend Amtrak’s plans to reduce the frequency of service of long distance trains.

“We remain fully committed to the long-distance service; that I want to make clear,” he said

“But at this point in time, the levels of ridership we expect to see in November, December, January, February and March indicate to us that moving to three-day-a-week service at that period of time is the right thing to do for [Amtrak] and for our owners, the government.”

Flynn said Amtrak will review the performance of the long-distance trains early next year, examining such things as future bookings and whether those justify restoring service to daily operation in late May or early June of 2021.

Currently, Flynn indicated that most Amtrak travel has been those traveling for personal reasons, including families. The carrier is seeing very little business travel.

Amtrak’s marketing department has been surveying its customer base to try to get a handle on what its prospective travel plans might be, including when they might travel again, how often they expect to travel and what the purpose of their travel will be.

Flynn said the carrier has been experimenting with pricing and has been able to gain many first-time customers in the Northeast Corridor.

In the meantime, Amtrak has delayed some capital projects to conserve cash and is seeking to eliminate discretionary spending as much as possible.

“We do need to resize the company to reflect the level of ridership that we anticipate in 2021, and no one has great visibility into what 2022 might look like,” Flynn said.

When asked what capital projects Amtrak has deferred, Flynn said, “It wasn’t necessarily larger projects around infrastructure.”

He said the carrier has made “huge progress on our key engineering projects on the Northeast Corridor.”

But it has put off some projects in information technology that it plans to take up later.

Flynn insisted that Amtrak’s long-term vision remains unchanged and that includes network growth.

He repeated the goals expressed by his predecessor, Richard Anderson, that Amtrak wants to provide new service or additional service to major metropolitan areas that have grown substantially in the past 40 years.

“So, it remains our strategy that we can double ridership on Amtrak over the next 20 years,” he said.

“There are key corridors that exist — many of which exist on long distance routes — that aren’t served today that would absolutely benefit from, and rightly demand, high-quality passenger-rail service.”

Some Amtrak Trains Are ‘Selling Out’

June 10, 2020

Although Amtrak trains continue to run with loads well under capacity, an analysis published on the Trains magazine website reported that some trains are selling out as ridership slowly begins to rise.

Of course Amtrak is only selling half the capacity of its coaches as a way to enforce social distancing and the sell outs or near sellouts have resulted in some high eye popping fares.

That included a coach fare of $260 from Chicago to Dallas, but $251 from Chicago to Pontiac, Illinois, a distance of 92 miles.

Yet a coach seat between Chicago and Normal, Illinois, a distance of 124 miles was available for a fare of $124.

Blame a yield management system that increases fares for segments with the heaviest ridership.

Amtrak spokesman Marc Magliari told Trains that Amtrak consists changed little between April and May.

However, the consists of some trains have since expanded. The Lake Shore Limited has been reported to now be operating with four Amfleet coaches, two for the New York section and two for the Boston section.

That is double the number of coaches that had been carried.

The Capitol Limited has been reported to have expanded from four cars to five or six.

Trains passenger correspondent Bob Johnston rode Amtrak’s Texas Eagle recently between Chicago and Normal.

His report indicated that the bathrooms, coaches and Sightseer lounge cars were clean on both trains and although passengers wore masks while boarding the train about half removed them after settling into their seats.

Johnston wrote that most passengers wore their masks while walking through the train.

He also said some food items were out of stock in the café car, including all of the fresh deli sandwiches and cheeseburgers.

Few passengers ate their meals in the lounge car after purchasing food there.

A spot check conducted by Trains over a 15-day period found numerous instances in which coach seats were sold out or nearly sold out on some long distance trains.

The westbound Lake Shore Limited had no day-of-departure coach seats on 11 of 15 days out of New York when No. 48 operated with a single Amfleet II coach.

Some seats that were available were priced at twice the normal $112 fare.

The spot check determined that sleeping cars were rarely sold out during the 15-day period.

Amtrak has not yet increased fares for sleepers much above the usual summer rates.

Trains also reported that it has learned that Amtrak on May 29 operated a special train of 15 empty Amfleet II coaches from the Hialeah Maintenance Facility in Miami to Jacksonville, Florida, for storage.

Service Cuts Likely for Amtrak Long-Distance Trains

May 27, 2020

Thus far during the economic downturn that has accompanied the COVID-19 pandemic Amtrak’s long-distance trains have been spared service cuts.

But that will soon change.

In a letter to Congress dated May 25 Amtrak said it is seeking $1.475 billion in “supplemental funding” to maintain “minimum service levels across the rail network” and continue capital projects.

This will be on top of the $2.04 billion that it requested for its regular federal fiscal year 2021 appropriation.

Even if it gets the additional funding, Amtrak said it plans to reduce the frequency of service on most long distance routes to less than daily service.

The passenger carrier also said it may cut its workforce by as much as 20 percent.

Amtrak said during the pandemic its routes are at best handling 10 percent of the ridership that they had as recently as February and that for FY2021 the passenger carrier expects ridership to be 50 percent of what it would have been otherwise.

The letter, written by Amtrak President William Flynn, acknowledged that projecting future ridership and revenue is difficult given the unprecedented nature of the pandemic and all the unknowns surrounding its trajectory.

However, most projections anticipate a second wave of infections in the fall and Amtrak expects that to depress ridership between September and February.

Recent polling data shows half of the respondents saying they would be reluctant to ride a train in the next six months and more than a third said they it could be a year or more before they would ride a train.

“Furthermore, when demand returns, we anticipate that changed behaviors, such as increased telework and reduced discretionary income, will likely impact ridership, along with capacity limits that may be needed to achieve social distancing on our trains,” Flynn wrote.

Aside from cutting long-distance service to less-than-daily service, Amtrak said it will sharply cut Northeast Corridor service to match demand.

Flynn said Amtrak expects reduced services in state-funded corridor service and is working with the states to determine what they will be able to fund in FY2021, which begins on Oct. 1.

“While our state partners will ultimately make these decisions in coordination with us, many of them have been clear that they will not be able to maintain currently reduced service or resume suspended service without supplemental funding,” Flynn wrote.

Amtrak said it would restore service levels to what they had been once ridership recovers sufficiently to support it if adequate funding is available.

Flynn’s letter contained few details as to how much reduction in frequency of service would occur in the next fiscal year unless Amtrak receives supplemental funding.

An appendix mentions consolidation of the Silver Meteor, Silver Star and Palmetto and hints that without additional federal funding some corridor services might be suspended or discontinued.

All long-distance trains except for the Auto Train are expected to operate at a lower level of service even if Amtrak receives the supplemental appropriation.

Without the supplemental appropriation, all long-distance trains except the Auto Train are said to be “at risk.”

In a message to Amtrak employees on Tuesday, Flynn conceded that Amtrak’s planned spending cuts “will cause stress in the organization.”

He said the carrier will seek to “minimize the negative impact” by offering incentives for employees to leave the company or retire before resorting to layoffs.

Flynn said Amtrak management is still figuring out how much it plans to reduce its workforce and how to assign those who remain on the payroll.

Amtrak expects to cut $500 million in expenses as a result of reducing frequency of operation and capacity ($150 million) and workforce reductions ($350 million).

Amtrak’s April Ridership Was Bad, But Bookings for Long-Distance Trains is Looking Promising

May 23, 2020

Amtrak ridership data for April was released this past week and it showed a sharp plunge compared with a year ago.

In April 2020 Amtrak handled 120,000 passengers compared to 2.7 million who rode in April 2019.

The ridership drop is attributed largely to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Northeast Corridor handled 19,000 passengers, a drop of 97.5 percent from a year earlier. It was the steepest ridership plunge system wide on a percentage basis.

Amtrak lost 87 percent of its passengers on the San Joaquin route in California.

Ridership of state-funded corridors fell 96 percent while the long-distance trains saw ridership fall 86.8 percent.

Year-to-date ridership is down 21 percent and revenues has fallen by 19 percent.

Amtrak expects those figures to grow and they might have been larger than they were but for strong ridership and revenue performances earlier in the year before social distancing measures were imposed.

In a related matter, the Amtrak vice president who oversees long-distance trains said the use of prepackaged meals for sleeper class passengers on Western trains will continue for at least another month.

Larry Chestler told the Rail Passengers Association that Amtrak has begun to see some early signs of recovery on many routes.

However, he cited safety and continued lagging ridership for waiting to restore traditional dining car service to the Western trains.

Chestler said the carrier will evaluate ridership data in late June and determine at that time whether to restore traditional dining car service.

The prepackaged meals have been served to sleeper class passengers on Eastern long-distance trains since June 2019 and were extended to all of those trains last October.

Although the long-distance trains have seen steep ridership drops, Chestler said those declines have been smaller than on other routes.

A recent rise in bookings for long-distance trains have given Amtrak some hope that higher demand is coming, Chestler said.

“Whether that means there’s more demand for summer it’s too soon to say,” he said.

In particular, bookings are trending upward for Coast Starlight and Southwest Chief with some growth also starting to show for the California Zephyr and Empire Builder.

Chestler said bookings are coming back “from the bottom of the bottom,” which Amtrak reached during the period of mid April to early May when it averaged 3,000 passengers a day nationwide.

Since then Amtrak ridership has doubled that, but it’s still well below what it would otherwise be at this time of year.

Some of the ridership of long-distance trains has occurred in regions where corridor trains have been suspended or reduced in frequency.

An example would be the Empire Builder between Chicago and Milwaukee where Hiawatha Service was suspended in favor of a once a day Thruway bus.

Before the pandemic, Amtrak operated seven daily roundtrips between Chicago and Milwaukee.

Chestler said Amtrak management considered continuing into the summer the reduced consists that began operating during the pandemic.

But management elected to move from what he termed “a kind of quasi-minimum” to restoring capacity for the summer.

“Had we reduced to the May levels [for the summer] we would have had a number of trains where we would have been essentially sold out already” in coach, Chestler said.

That doesn’t mean all of the seats would have been occupied because Amtrak for now is selling only half of the capacity of each coach assigned to a train in order to maintain social distancing.

“On the [Southwest] Chief and the [California] Zephyr and the [Empire] Builder there’s more sleepers [and] typically one more coach,” he said.

“We’ve balanced the use of baggage coaches and other kinds of cars to put an appropriate amount of capacity” in place “to capture demand signals from customers,” Chestler said.

Amtrak management is mindful that reducing capacity also could dampen the return of demand because the seats aren’t available.

Amtrak Looking Toward Post Pandemic World

April 25, 2020

Amtrak management is studying a number of scenarios for ramping service back up once the COVID-19 pandemic has passed.

In the meantime, though, the passenger carrier expects to lose $700 million in adjusted operating earnings as a result of the pandemic.

Amtrak Chairman Anthony Coscia along with new CEO William Flynn and Executive Vice President Stephen Gardner gave those assessments during a conference call with news reporters.

Amtrak ridership across its system has fallen by 95 percent and it has suspended 57 percent of its services.

Amtrak is receiving $1 billion in emergency federal aid and Coscia said that assistance will enable Amtrak to avoid having to tap its capital reserves and avoid employee layoffs.

He said that before the pandemic began Amtrak was “on track” to break even in operating earnings by Fiscal Year 2021 for the first time in the railroad’s history.

That figure counts as revenue funding that Amtrak receives from various state governments to operate corridor service.

Flynn said the carrier has been taking advantage of the lower ridership period to perform track work and other “critical” projects.

In looking to the future, Flynn said Amtrak officials are studying touchless technology at fare gates and changing some food service.

One idea being explored is enabling passengers to pre-order food and beverages from café cars.

Flynn said Amtrak expects it will take three months or more for ridership to return to pre-pandemic levels.

It is not clear when that clock would start. Some governors have been talking in recent days about easing social distancing restrictions on or after May 1, although some forms of social distancing are expected to remain in place either by mandate or recommendation.

Flynn said Amtrak has been researching various ideas of what the pandemic recovery will look like and have created several service plans based on “surveys of customer sentiment.”

In some instances, Flynn indicated, Amtrak will “introduce product ahead of demand.”

“We have to demonstrate to our customers that we have an attractive product that they will value when they come back,” Flynn said.

Gardner said Amtrak is looking at implementing new ticketing kiosks and text messaging to inform passengers where to head once they arrive at their station.

The downloadable schedules that have been removed from the Amtrak website will be reintroduced once services are restored.

Flynn said none of Amtrak’s unions have thus far shown an interest in delaying or giving up negotiated wage increases.

“But we continue to work with union leadership so they understand where we are in this crisis and how we are going to move forward,” he said.

Trains magazine reported that Amtrak spokesman Marc Magliari said 58 percent of onboard service employees are on an extra board that guarantees them 150 hours per month of work.

Regularly assigned employees are guaranteed a 180-hour month, so their pay cut works out to about 16 percent.

“Engineers and conductors have a 40-hour-a-week guarantee, but many of them previously worked assignments that included overtime, which has been reduced,” Magliari said.

Amtrak Averaging 4,000 Passengers Per Day

April 14, 2020

Amtrak is carrying an average of 4,000 passengers a day during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The carrier normally averages 100,000 passengers a day. About 57 percent of Amtrak’s departures have been temporarily suspended with the Northeast Corridor seeing a reduction of 77 percent of its scheduled trains.

“We are running trains where we have more staff than customers,” Amtrak CEO Richard Anderson said during an employee town hall meeting last week.

Anderson described the $1.018 billion in emergency aid it is receiving from the federal government as essential but said “we are burning about $50 million a week in cash.”

Anderson said Amtrak’s recovery from the pandemic will proceed as travel demand grows.

“We are going to be a very different railroad when we come out the other other side of this; we will be 20% smaller,” he said.

Anderson hopes that travelers understand Amtrak doesn’t pack passengers aboard its trains as densely as airlines do in their planes.

That could favor Amtrak in shorter-haul markets, he said.