Posts Tagged ‘Amtrak P42DC locomotives’

Statehouse at Joliet

August 11, 2017

The southbound  St. Louis-bound Statehouse rolls into Joliet Union Station on June 19, 1998. Aside from the Phase III livery on the P42DC locomotive, the scene is similar in appearance to today in that some Chicago-St. Louis passenger trains feature a mix of Horizon coaches and Anfleet food service cars.

The Statehouse was funded in part by the State of Illinois and at the time operated on a mid-day schedule.

A Late Lake Shore Limited

May 24, 2017

Sometimes you are just not in the right position to get a good photograph. Such was the case when I “caught” Amtrak’s eastbound Lake Shore Limited passing through Willoughby, Ohio.

I didn’t know it had not come through yet, that it was running 1 hours, 28 minutes late. I might have known that had I checked on its status with Amtrak. But I didn’t.

The appearance of No. 48 caught me by surprise and the best I could do was get this image looking down Erie Street.

When the LSL Was a Regular Daylight Train in Cleveland

April 26, 2017

It was in 2007, I believe, that Amtrak rescheduled the eastbound Lake Shore Limited to arrive and depart Cleveland between 6 and 7 a.m., which meant it was a daylight operation for a good part of the year.

That schedule didn’t last long and No. 48 soon enough began leaving Chicago at 9:30 p.m., which puts it into Cleveland at 5:35 a.m.

I didn’t take advantage of the 2007 window of opportunity as much as I should have. A friend, though, did. He made it a point to photograph No. 48 in as many places as he could between Cleveland and the Pennsylvania border just east of Conneaut, Ohio, during the summer of 2007.

I did get downtown on a couple of occasions to photograph No. 48 in the station, including this view made on July 14, 2007.

Note that lead unit No. 156 is the one that is now painted in Amtrak’s Phase I locomotive livery.

One Morning in Crawfordsville, Indiana

March 6, 2017
Amtrak train No. 851 approaches the Crawfordsville station in August 2011.

Amtrak train No. 851 approaches the Crawfordsville station in August 2011.

When I lived in Indiana between 1983 and 1991, Amtrak’s Hoosier State was a part of my life for periodic day trips from Indianapolis to Chicago.

I actually preferred to ride the Cardinal because it had a full-service dining car and slumber coaches, which offered a reasonable fare for a return trip to Indy.

But the Cardinal only ran three days a week so more often than not I wound up going to Chicago on the Hoosier State.

After leaving Indiana for Pennsylvania and, later, Ohio, I rarely saw the Hoosier State again.

I followed its story from afar, including how it was discontinued in 1995 only to be brought back because operating a hospital train to and from Beech Grove shops in suburban Indianapolis didn’t work out so well.

In August 2011 I was on my way to Illinois. I stayed overnight in Indianapolis and got up early the next morning to get to Crawfordsville before No. 851 did.

The sun wasn’t yet above the tree line when the Hoosier State arrived, but there was enough light to document the coming and going of the train.

Since making these images, the Hoosier State has had a rough ride at times with the latest development being the takeover of the train by Iowa Pacific Holdings in July 2015.

IP won high marks for its on-board service, but the Indiana Department of Transportation declined IP’s request for more money.

So IP pulled out and Amtrak has resumed operation of the Hoosier State. Actually, Amtrak was never completely out of the picture with Nos. 850 and 851 because it provided the operating crews and handled relationships with the host railroads.

So now what was the usual state of affairs in Crawfordsville is back again. Here is a look back at a morning not too long ago when the Hoosier State came calling.

A typical Amshack that is so typical in smaller cities served by Amtrak.

A typical Amshack that is so typical in smaller cities served by Amtrak.

The old Monon station is no longer used by Amtrak.

The old Monon station is no longer used by Amtrak.

All aboard for Chicago and all intermediate stops.

All aboard for Chicago and all intermediate stops.

And away it goes to its next stop in Lafayette.

And away it goes to its next stop in Lafayette.

A ;l;ast look at the train, which has two cars being ferried from Beech Grove to Chicago.

A ;l;ast look at the train, which has two cars being ferried from Beech Grove to Chicago.

Kicking Up a Little Snow

February 27, 2017

amtrak-48-berea-april-7-2007

Contrary to appearances, this image of Amtrak’s eastbound Lake Shore Limited was made in April.

No. 48 is running several hours late as it kicks up the snow in Berea, Ohio, a suburb of Cleveland. Snow in Northeast Ohio, even heavy snow, during April is not unusual.

I didn’t know that No. 48 was running late. I might have learned about it from a radio transmission or simply seeing an Amtrak train come around the bend.

We don’t always get this much snow in April, but it happens. The photo was made on April 7, 2007, and was scanned from a slide.

Unusual Corridor Train Double Header

February 7, 2017

illini-at-pesotum

Virtually every Amtrak Midwest corridor train I’ve ever seen was being pulled by one locomotive. In some corridors Amtrak may have a locomotive on each end of the train to avoid the need to turn the train at a terminus point.

But only once have I seen a corridor train with two locomotives on the point.

Shown above is the northbound Illini at Pesotum, Illinois, in August 2012 with a pair of P42DCs leading. I can’t say if both units are online or why on this particular day two units were assigned.

I had seen this equipment set earlier in the day when it went south with the Saluki bound for Carbondale, Illinois.

So I planned to make an image of that equipment set when it returned to Chicago with the Illini.

Fill ‘er Up With Diesel Fuel

January 23, 2017

coast-starlight-sac-june-26-1999-2

Except in New Jersey, full-service gas stations where someone comes out and fills up your vehicle have rapidly vanished from the American landscape.

But on the railroad, it is common for someone to top off the tanks of locomotives with diesel fuel. And so it is with Amtrak.

At many intermediate stations on the Amtrak network, a fuel truck drives up before the arrival of a train and the driver gets out and puts diesel fuel into the locomotive tanks.

It is routine that is not practiced in all that many places when you consider how many stations that Amtrak has.

But it is train time ritual nonetheless and one that gets little attention from passengers or railroad photographers.

This particular scene unfolded in Sacramento, California, on June 26, 1999, as a worker fills the tanks of the Los Angeles-bound Coast Starlight.

Pointing Eastward

January 21, 2017

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Amtrak P42DC No. 75 is on the point of the eastbound California Zephyr as it makes its station stop in Sacramento,  California.

This is a crew change point and a new engineer will take the right-hand seat in the cab to man the control of No. 75 ans it, a fellow P42 and an F40PH throttle up to move No. 6 eastward en route to Chicago.

The image was made on June 25, 1999, and was scanned from a slide.

Empire Builder in Portland

December 27, 2016

empire-builder-portland-june-29-1999-2

Amtrak P42DC No. 1 waits to pull the Empire Builder out of Portland Union Station on a July 1999 afternoon. Known as the “baby Builder” due to its four-car consist, No. 28 will connect with the Seattle section in the middle of the night in Spokane, Washington.

It will offers its passengers a scenic ride along the Columbia River not long after leaving Portland.

Parked behind the Empire Builder on the same track is a Talgo train used in Portland-Seattle Cascades service.

The Very Late Running Season

October 24, 2016

brady01

It is August 2014 and Amtrak is in the midst of a nightmare summer on Norfolk Southern. It was routine then for the Capitol Limited and Lake Shore Limited to operate several hours off schedule.

NS had instituted a new computerized dispatching system and things were chaotic for several months. It also didn’t help that it was the height of the summer track work season and in some places trains had to fit through a single-track stretch.

Yet another complication was that very late arriving Amtrak trains in Chicago meant late turns due to the need for crew rest and equipment servicing.

Although not good for passengers, it was good news for photographers living in places where Amtrak would under ordinary circumstances pass through in the middle of the night.

In the photo above, train No. 30, the eastbound Capitol Limited should have been through Brady Lake, Ohio, located between Cleveland and Alliance, about six hours ago. But on this date it was making a daylight run through Northeast Ohio.