Posts Tagged ‘Amtrak F40PH locomotives’

An Eagle and a Commuter

May 21, 2021

Appearances to the contrary, the train the left is not an Amtrak train. It is a Trinity Railway Express commuter train using leased Amtrak equipment.

That included a pair of F40PH locomotives and two Horizon Fleet coaches.

On the next track over the Texas Eagle is making its daily stop at the Dallas Union Terminal. Note that the Eagle has a new P40 on the point and a veteran F40PH trailing.

When this image was made on March 4, 1997, such mixed motive power consists were not unusual and would continue through the late 1990s until the P42 fleet began arriving.

Amtrak in Ashville

February 2, 2021

For the 1996 National Railway Historical Society convention held in Charlotte, North Carolina, Amtrak provided a chartered train that made a circle trip on Norfolk Southern.

The train traveled via Asheville, North Carolina, The scenic highlights included traversing the famed loops east of the city and coming down Saluda grade, the steepest mainline railroad grade in the United States.

The train is shown here in an NS yard in Asheville where passengers had a layover.

Shortly after this image was made, NS added two of its freight locomotives to the front of the train to provide additional braking power on Saluda grade.

Most of the passenger cars were Amtrak equipment with a few borrowed from the fleet of the North Carolina Department of Transportation for use on Piedmont service trains.

Amtrak has never provided scheduled service to Asheville although the Southern Railway did for a time in the early years of Amtrak.

Last Years of the Broadway Limited

February 1, 2021

In Amtrak’s early years, the Chicago-New York/Washington Broadway Limited was considered its premier eastern long distance train.

But by the 1990s it had become just another train, albeit still a good one with full-service dining and sleeping cars. Many of the passenger cars were from Amtrak’s Heritage Fleet.

The Broadway Limited also handled a lot of head-end business as can be seen in this image made on CSX’s New Castle Subdivision near the Ohio-Pennsylvania border.

This was once the route of Baltimore & Ohio’s best train, the Capitol Limited. Although Amtrak has a train of the same name operating between Chicago and Washington, it has never used this stretch of the former B&O.

This image was made in May 1994 and in a year and four months Nos. 40 and 41 would make their final trips operating as the Broadway Limited.

California Zephyr in Colorado

January 15, 2021

It is late June 1988. The photographer and a friend had ridden Amtrak’s California Zephyr to Denver to spend a week railfanning Denver & Rio Grande Western lines in Colorado.

They managed to catch Amtrak Nos. 5 and 6 numerous times on the Moffat Tunnel route. In those days three F40PH locomotives was the standard motive power consist.

In the top photograph, No. 6 is cruising along the Colorado River in Byers Canyon. In the middle, No. 5 is coming into Winter Park as it exits Moffat Tunnel. In the bottom image, the westbound Zephyr is at Rollins, Colorado.

Photographs by Edward Ribinskas

Maple Leaf Leaving Toronto in 1984

November 10, 2020

Amtrak’s Maple Leaf is leaving Toronto Union Station on March 28, 1984, bound for New York City. On the point is F40PH No. 352. As it picks its way through the terminal complex, it passes a VIA Rail Canada train that is backing up. The photographer thought it might have been headed for the wash rack.

Photograph by Robert Farkas

Cardinal Flying Through a Hurricane

October 18, 2020

Amtrak’s eastbound Cardinal is passing milepost 479 on the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad in Hurricane, West Virginia, on Oct. 18, 1987. The photographer was in Hurricane to photograph the New River Train which in this year was being pulled by former Nickel Plate Road 2-8-4 No. 765. The distance is measured from Newport News, Virginia.

Photograph by Edward Ribinskas

The Pennsylvanian in Gallitzin in 1994

October 16, 2020

It is May 30, 1994, in Gallitzin, Pennsylvania. Amtrak’s westbound Pennsylvanian has just popped out of Gallitzin Tunnel en route to Pittsburgh from New York.

Gallitzin Tunnel is the northern most of the then three tunnels in Gallitzin on the former Pennsylvania Railroad mainline between Philadelphia and Pittsburgh.

The tunnel on the right is the Allegheny Tunnel. During the summer of 1994 an enlargement project was begun to double track and enlarge this tunnel to accommodate double-stacked container trains.

When the work was completed in the summer of 1995 the Gallitzin Tunnel was closed.

The tunnels in Gallitzin are not all that has changed. The Pennsylvanian is no longer pulled by F40PH locomotives and no longer has material handling cars. But Amfleet equipment is still standard.

Photograph by Edward Ribinskas

State of the Cardinal in 1987

August 1, 2020

I’ve long thought that the halcyon days for Amtrak’s Cardinal were in the late 1980s to early 1990s.

Sure, the train only operated three days a week, just as it still does today, but the level of service provided was much higher then it would become starting in 1995 when it was assigned Superliner equipment and reduced to a Chicago-Washington operation.

In the late 1980s, Nos. 50 and 51 operated with two sleeping cars, one of which was a slumber coach. The fare was reasonable enough that I could afford to buy a slumbercoach room for travel between Chicago and Indianapolis.

The Cardinal also still had a full-service dining car during this era.

In the photograph above, the Cardinal is shown at Fort Spring, West Virginia, on July 26, 1987, exiting a tunnel on the former Chesapeake & Ohio mainline.

Photograph by Edward Ribinskas

Early Generation Pennsylvanian

July 24, 2020

Amtrak’s Pennsylvanian has had a long and colorful history. It began on April 27, 1980, as a Pittsburgh-Philadelphia train funded by the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation.

It was intended to replace, in part, the National Limited, which had been discontinued on Oct. 1, 1979, a move that ended intercity rail passenger service to Columbus and Dayton.

Extended to New York in October 1983, Nos. 46 and 47 got off to a slow start from a ridership perspective. But patronage soon took off and by 1994 the Pennsylvanian had become part of Amtrak’s basic network.

That would later change and for a time in the late 1990s the Pennsylvanian operated west of Pittsburgh via Cleveland.

But all of that was down the road when this image was made near Lewistown, Pennsylvania, on June 27, 1988.

The Pennsylvanian looked then like any other eastern corridor service train pulled by an F40PH with a string of Amfleet coaches and a cafe car trailing.

Photograph by Robert Farkas

Twilight Years of the F40PH

June 24, 2020

For several years starting in the late 1970s the F40PH was the workhorse of the Amtrak motive fleet outside electrified territory in the Northeast.

There were a handful of P30CH locomotives in service then as well as a few GP40TC units acquired from Toronto’s GO Transit, some P32-8s and a few FL9s in the East.

But chances are through the early to middle 1990s your train was pulled by an F40, particularly if it was a long-distance train.

By the late 1999s the Genesis models P40DC an P42DC had begun taking over primary motive power duties.

A handful of F40s hung on in service, but they seldom were leading units.

Such is the case above with the eastbound California Zephyr making its station stop in Sacramento, California, where F40PH No. 302 is the third unit behind a pair of P42DC units.

No. 302 was built in April 1979 and still in active service until being retired by Amtrak in December 2001.