Posts Tagged ‘Amtrak exhibit train’

Amtrak 48 Combined With Exhibit Train

May 5, 2016

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On Tuesday night, the Amtrak exhibit train was combined with the eastbound Lake Shore Limited.

Here is a 45-minute late No. 48 approaching the new Shamrock Boulevard overpass just west of the Ohio Route 44 overpass in Lake County, Ohio, east of Cleveland.

Leading No. 48 was Phase IV heritage locomotive P42DC No. 184 followed by P40 N o. 822 and NPCU 406, a former F40PH. The latter two units wear the Phase III heritage livery.

The consist of the exhibit train was cars 10020, 10093, 10094, 10095 and 85999, followed by baggage 61032, Viewliner sleepers 62029,62035,62031, Heritage diner 8524, Amfleet lounge car 28004 and Amfleet II coaches 25065, 25117, 25107, 25008 and 25120.

Photographs by Edward Ribinskas

Amtrak Exhibit Train to Visit Grand Rapids

July 7, 2015

The Amtrak exhibit train will roll into Grand Rapids, Michigan, on July 25.

The train will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. as part of the year-long Amtrak Train Days. The train will be parked at the Amtrak station.

Also being featured will be the Chuggington Kids Depot with toy train and coloring tables.

For more information, visit  http://www.amtrak.com/exhibit-train

 

Amtrak on Display at Toledo National Train Day

May 10, 2015
It can't pull a train anymore, but F40PH No. 406 still looks the part.

It can’t pull a train anymore, but F40PH No. 406 still looks the part.

Sure, seeing the Norfolk Southern GoRail locomotive motivated me to drive to Toledo on May 2 for the National Train Day event.

But what I really wanted to see was Amtrak P42 No. 42. It is dressed in a striking livery that honor’s America’s veterans. It was every bit as classy looking as I expected it be and it was my first time seeing it in person.

And then there was Amtrak No. 406. Built in July 1988 by EMD, this F40PH has since had its traction motors removed and been converted to a NPCU, meaning that it can provide head-end power and be used to control a locomotive, but it can’t pull a train.

Yet for appearances, it looks just like it did when it came out of the EMD factory, complete with a Phase III livery.

Last Saturday it provided HEP for the Amtrak exhibit train and I found myself being transported back a decade or two when the F40 was the king of the Amtrak diesel fleet.

During their heyday, the F40 was the Rodney Dangerfield of locomotives.

A lot of railfans didn’t care for them. They made a lot of noise when standing in the station and they were diminutive in stature compared with their big six-axle freight cousins.

Not too many people are going to say they prefer the look of an F40 over the sleek streamlining of an EMD E or F unit.

I’ve always been partial to the short-lived SDP40Fs that Amtrak purchased in 1973 and 1974, but the F40 proved to be the locomotive that enjoyed the longer life even if it had been designed with corridor service in mind.

So I spent some time looking over the 406 and remembering all of the trips I made behind the F40 fleet until it began to be replaced in the middle 1990s.

It’s funny how something that was so common two decades can seemingly vanish overnight.

In time the same will likely happen with the P42. Will I someday have pangs of nostalgia upon seeing one of those? Probably, yes I will. But that day hasn’t come yet.

What I came to see.

What I came to see.

It's almost highball time for the next Amtrak train to New York at Toledo's Central Union Terminal. If only it were true.

It’s almost highball time for the next Amtrak train to New York at Toledo’s Central Union Terminal. If only it were true.

A father and his daughter spend some quality time in the Sightseer lounge, imagining they are taking a train trip.

A father and his daughter spend some quality time in the Sightseer lounge, imagining they are taking a train trip.

Built in 1950 for Union Pacific, sleeper Pacific Bend has racked up thousands of miles and seen a lot of places in its lifetime. No longer carrying revenue passengers, it is now assigned to the Amtrak exhibit train.

Built in 1950 for Union Pacific, sleeper Pacific Bend has racked up thousands of miles and seen a lot of places in its lifetime. No longer carrying revenue passengers, it is now assigned to the Amtrak exhibit train.

Amtrak's latest slogan on the side of former baggage cars turned exhibit cars.

Amtrak’s latest slogan on the side of former baggage cars turned exhibit cars.

The gray of P42 No. 42 is a throwback of sorts to the days of New York Central vanish sitting on these very same tracks.

The gray of P42 No. 42 is a throwback of sorts to the days of New York Central vanish sitting on these very same tracks.

Toledo07a

Memphis To Celebrate Its Railroad History

September 17, 2014

 

The railroad history of Memphis will be on display during the grand opening of Memphis Central Station on Oct. 4.

The occasion is the 100th anniversary of the station. The event is being sponsored by the Memphis Railroad & Trolley Museum.

A ceremony will be held at 11 a.m. with free admission for the public from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Amtrak Exhibit Train will be  on hand and open for tours by schools and groups between noon and 5 p.m. on  Friday (Oct. 3) and to the public on Saturday between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. and on Sunday from noon to 5 p.m.

A Norfolk Southern exhibit car will be on display during the same hours as the Amtrak train. A Canadian National locomotive cab will be open for visitors on Saturday between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. BNSF, CSX and Union Pacific will all have locomotives on display.

“The 100th anniversary of the opening of Memphis’ Central Station marks a major event in the railroad history of the Mid-South,” said museum President Mike Fleming. “Preserving the ‘Rich and Colorful Railroad History of Memphis and the Mid-South’ is the goal of the Memphis Railroad & Trolley Museum.”

For additional information, call 901-590-3099 or go to www.mrtm.org. Museum entrance fees will be waived on Saturday.

Memphis Central Station is served daily by Amtrak’s City of New Orleans between Chicago and New Orleans.