Posts Tagged ‘Amtrak conductor shooting’

Suspect in Amtrak Shooting May be Unfit For Trial

August 3, 2017

The Amtrak conductor who was shot in May during a station stop in Naperville, Illinois, has returned home while the man charged in his shooting has been described as not mentally fit to stand trial.

Klein

A court-appointed psychologist reached that conclusion after examining Edward Klein, 79, of West Allis, Wisconsin.

The report is considered private, but was discussed in general during a court status hearing this week.

Klein has been charged with attempted murder and other felonies. He has been held in the DuPage County Jail since the May 23 shooting.

The conductor, Michael Case, was hospitalized for 10 weeks as he recovered from injuries to his abdomen. Case, 45, resides in Homewood, Illinois, and was working the inbound Southwest Chief when he was shot.

Hospital officials have said Case now faces months of additional rehabilitation.

During the court proceedings, discussions between attorneys and the judge indicated that it is unlikely that Klein can be returned to mental fitness within a year. Another hearing will be held on Aug. 7.

Public Defender Jeff York contended during a hearing last month that Klein was unfit for trial, but that determination will be made by a judge.

Defendants declared unfit to stand trial are usually committed temporarily to a mental health facility to receive treatment intended to restore mental fitness.

In cases in which a defendant is ruled to be unlikely to regain fitness, a longer term involuntary commitment may be imposed.

Police have said that Klein, a retired federal law enforcement officer, was returning to Wisconsin after deciding en route to cancel a planned trip to Las Vegas.

Officials have said Klein was apparently angry because Case has refused to allow him to disembark at Naperville. Amtrak officials had become concerned about his behavior aboard the train and were watching him to ensure that he made his connection in Chicago to a Milwaukee-bound train.

Klein is alleged to have taken a revolver from his carry-on bag, leaned out a train door window and fired at Case.

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Amtrak Conductor Continues Recovery

June 21, 2017

The Amtrak conductor shot in Naperville, Illinois, last month continues to make steady progress and doctors are optimistic that he will make a full recovery.

Michael Case, 45, remains hospitalized, but has made enough progress that he might not need another surgery that doctors expected to have to perform.

“The bottom line, he should be able to eat, he should be able to function, he should be able to work; we’re a long ways away from that, and his condition although fairly stable, could take a turn,” said Dr. David Piazza, the Medical Director of Trauma Surgery at Edward Hospital.

However, Piazza cautioned that a devastating infection or blood clots, or pneumonia could still hamper Case’s recovery and even take his life.

Piazza said Case faces six to eight weeks of rehab and will eventually have a final surgery in about six to nine months.

Case, a conductor on the inbound Southwest Chief, was shot on May 16 while standing on the platform of the Naperville Metra Station.

Edward Klein, 79, of Wisconsin has been charged in connection with the shooting. Klein is being held on a $1.5 million bond and will appear in court on June 28.

He has been changed with attempted murder and aggravated battery.

Amtrak Conductor Facing Long Road to Recovery

June 2, 2017

The Amtrak conductor shot last month on the station platform in Naperville, Illinois, remains hospitalized in stable, but critical condition, officials said this week.

Michael Case, 45, of Homewood, Illinois, underwent another surgery this week and a doctor said he may have to have future operations.

Dr. David Piazza, medical director of trauma surgery at Edward Hospital in Naperville, said Case faces a “long hard slog” as he recovers from a bullet wound to his abdomen.

“He’s going to be out of commission for six to nine months,” Piazza said at a news conference, referring to when Case will be able to leave the hospital.

Piazza said the bullet went through Case’s abdomen, penetrating his intestine, including a portion right below the stomach. Also damaged was the head of his pancreas.

Doctors also had to remove Case’s colon. “This is a very significant area to be injured,” Piazza said. “A lot of things come together at this site, including the contents from the stomach, the bile from the liver and the fluid from the pancreas.”

Case has been able to eat green gelatin and clear liquids, including ginger ale.

A 79-year-old Wisconsin man, Edward Klein, has been charged with attempted murder in connection with the shooting.

Klein is being held at the DuPage County jail in lieu of $1.5 million bail and has been ordered by a judge to undergo a psychiatric evaluation.

Prosecutors said Klein had become angry when Amtrak personnel would not let him disembark at Naperville. Klein was traveling on the Southwest Chief to Chicago from Kansas City.

Amtrak personnel aboard the train had become concerned with Klein’s behavior and well-being, hence their refusal to let him get off before Chicago Union Station.

Piazza said Case has been a good patient, describing him as pleasant, laid back and very conversive.

Several crowd-funding sites, such as GoFundMe, have been established to help Case and his family with medical and other expenses.

Illinois Judge Orders Mental Health Evaluation of Suspect Charged in Shooting of Amtrak Conductor in Naperville

May 26, 2017

An Illinois judge on Thursday ordered a suspect in the shooting of an Amtrak conductor to receive a mental health evaluation.

DuPage County judge Daniel Guerin made the ruling in granting a motion from a defense attorney representing Edward Klein, who is charged with attempted murder and aggravated assault.

Klein, 79, of West Allis, Wisconsin, is charged in connection with the shooting of Michael Case of Homewood, Illinois, as he worked on the platform at Naperville, Illinois, after the eastbound Southwest Chief came to a halt there.

Case, who remains hospitalized, was shot once in the abdomen during the May 16 shooting.

Prosecutors have said in court filings that Klein became angry when he was denied permission to disembark from the train in Naperville rather than continue to Chicago Union Station as he was ticketed.

Amtrak personnel kept the door of the car in which Klein was riding closed to prevent him from disembarking because they were concerned about his welfare.

Some passengers have told reporters that Klein was exhibiting disturbing behavior before the train reached Naperville and that he had caused a disturbance in Kansas City, when Train No. 4 was late in arriving at the station there.

A news report indicated that during a May 19 court hearing, Klein seemed unable to grasp the severity of the situation.

He said several times that he was leaving the next day and said he would not need the public defender to represent him because he would soon be leaving.

During the Thursday hearing, Klein spoke several times, telling the judge at one point that he had an appointment.

Judge Guerin, though, ordered the public defender’s office to represent Klein, who is being held in lieu of $1.5 million bail.

“After meeting with our client, we had immediate concerns about his fitness to stand trial,” said Assistant Public Defender Jennifer Maples.

Klein could be sent to a security facility if he is found mentally unfit. He might be sent to Elgin Mental Health Center, to receive treatment.

If doctors later determine that he is mentally fit, the criminal court proceedings against Klein would continue.

Klein is a former officer with the Federal Protective Service, which is overseen by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. His next court date has been set for late June.

Amtrak Conductor’s Condition Upgraded to Serious

May 24, 2017

The condition of the Amtrak conductor who was shot last week in Naperville, Illinois, has been upgraded from critical to serious.

Doctors said that Michael Case, 45, of Homewood, Illinois, remains in Edward Hospital in Naperville after being shot in the abdomen and suffering what they described as “very significant intestinal injuries.”

Case was shot with a single bullet from a .38-caliber revolver and faces a long recovery time. He was working on the eastbound Southwest Chief at the time.

The doctors said Case suffered injuries to his pancreas and a region of the intestines called the duodenum, but many of the major blood vessels in the area were not harmed, which should aid his recovery.

Edward Klein, 79, of West Allis, Wisconsin, has been charged with attempted murder and aggravated battery in connection with the shooting.

Klein will next appear in DuPage County court on June 12.

Man Charged in Amtrak Conductor Shooting

May 22, 2017

As an Amtrak conductor continues to recover from being shot by a disgruntled passenger last week, a retired law enforcement official now living in Wisconsin.

Edward Klein, 79, of West Allis, Wisconsin, has been charged in DuPage County, Illinois, with attempted murder and aggravated battery charges. During a bond hearing on Friday, Klein was ordered held in lieu of $1.5 million bail.

Edward Klein

Klein is charged with shooting Amtrak conductor Michael Case as he worked the platform during a stop in Naperville, Illinois, on May 16.

Authorities have said Klein was angry because he wasn’t allowed to disembark from the eastbound Southwest Chief at Naperville.

Prosecutors said Klein fired a single shot from a .38-caliber Smith and Wesson revolver through an open window of the train.

According to a police report, Klein was ticketed to go to Chicago. When he was told he couldn’t get off at Naperville, which is located 28 miles west of Chicago Union Station, Klein allegedly pulled out a revolver, leaned from the  train window and fired, hitting Case in the abdomen.

The Chicago Tribune reported that Klein told investigators: “I had built up all this anger, and I blew him away.”

News reports said that Klein once worked for the Federal Protective Services, a branch of Homeland Security responsible for protecting federal buildings. He lived in an independent living facility in the Milwaukee region.

In a court hearing, prosecutors said Klein had been traveling to Las Vegas to visit a friend, but instead got off an Amtrak train in Kansas City, Missouri. He later boarded Amtrak No. 4 for Chicago in Kansas City.

Amtrak personnel who had become concerned for Klein’s welfare had helped arrange for someone to pick him up in Chicago to take him home, authorities said.

After the shooting, Klein tried to get off the train by climbing through a window, but other passengers and Amtrak personnel restrained Klein until police arrived.

Klein said in court that he didn’t need a public defender but didn’t indicate if he had hired an attorney. A status hearing will be held on June 12.

In the meantime, Case continues to recover in a hospital where doctors say he is improving but his body is still responding to the effects of the shooting.

The bullet wound caused injuries to multiple organs and he underwent an arduous six hours of surgery at Edward Hospital in Naperville.

“His injuries are stabilized, but the body’s response to injuries is still going,” said Dr. David Piazza, trauma director at Edward Hospital. “He was critically injured and he’s recovering from that state at this point. We are heading in the right direction, but he has a long way to go.”

Case has been sedated and is on a ventilator. His wife, Sara Case, told reporters in Chicago that she has not been able to talk to her husband since his surgery.

However, he did speak with her by phone before the surgery. “He just said to me ‘I love you, I love you, I love you,'” Sara Case said. “You never think your husband is going to go to work and be shot.”

Michael Case, 45, has worked at Amtrak for about a decade and is a father of four. He and Sara Case have been married for nine years.

Case’s family says the outpouring of support from friends, family and even strangers has been overwhelming.

In another development, a witness to the shooting said that a Naperville station worker did little to let her and other passengers seek cover in a secure area.

The witness told a Chicago television station that shortly after the Southwest Chief pulled into the station, she and others heard a loud pop.

The woman, who was waiting for a Metra train bound for Chicago, said she saw the Amtrak conductor fall to the ground.

“I heard a loud pop, looked over to see what it was, and I saw what looked like a conductor fall towards the train station. And I was going to go help him when I realized it was gunshots,” she said.

Metra passengers alerted the Amtrak agent at the station and looked for cover, unaware that the gunman was aboard the train.

“She [worker] was trying to open the door,” the witness said. “When she opened it, we tried to follow her in because we would be protected there, because we were scared. And she closed the door and locked it, and said, ‘You can’t come in here.’ And I said, ‘What are we supposed to do?’ And she said, ‘Go to the bathroom.’ ”

The witness said employees seemed unprepared to deal with an emergency situation.

In response, an Amtrak spokesperson said, “This was traumatic for everyone involved. We’ll look at lessons learned from the incident.”

S.W. Chief Conductor Reported in Critical Condition, Charges Pending in Shooting

May 18, 2017

The Amtrak conductor wounded in a shooting in Naperville, Illinois, on Tuesday was still in critical condition authorities said Thursday afternoon.

The conductor of the Southwest Chief was identified as Michael Case, 45, of Homewood, Illinois. He was being treated at Edward Hospital in Naperville.

Authorities have taken a suspect into custody but have yet to identify him other than being a man in his 70s from Wisconsin.

Case underwent surgery on Wednesday morning to treat wounds that he suffered in his torso. The shooting occurred after he stepped down to the platform during a scheduled station stop for Amtrak train No. 4.

Police said that Case and a passenger had gotten into an argument before the shooting occurred.

Reports indicate that the suspect shot the conductor from aboard the train. Other passengers restrained the suspect until police arrived.

Naperville police Cmdr. Lou Cammiso said officers have interviewed witnesses and reviewed surveillance footage at the station. Charges are expected to be filed by the DuPage County prosecutor’s office.

“The suspect was on the train; the victim was off the train,” Cammiso said. “Not knowing the intention of the suspect, not knowing what further acts he was capable of, I think it was key that the other passengers did restrain him for police. I think that possibly could have saved lives.”

According to police, the suspect fired one shot during the incident.

A passenger, Mike Leming, of Lake Forest, California, was en route to Chicago where he planned to connect with an Amtrak train to Boston.

He said the argument that preceded the shooting had to do with luggage.

Amtrak officials said over the station’s public address system that police needed to interview passengers who possibly saw something before they could leave.

The announcement said the priority was to get buses for passengers seeking a connecting ride to Cleveland, then “sleepers,” and then everyone else. No. 4 was running two late at the time of the Naperville stop.

“With the assistance of the assistant conductor and several passengers, a suspect was taken into custody by the Naperville Police Department without further incident,” said Amtrak spokesman Marc Magliari. “This senseless and random act of violence is under investigation, and [Amtrak police are] working closely with local law enforcement personnel.”

The Southwest Chief had 239 passengers aboard when it arrived in Naperville and the train was delayed another three hours while police investigated the shooting.

Magliari said Amtrak held connecting passengers at Union Station until passengers from No. 4 could arrive.

He would not speculate about whether Amtrak will change its security procedures.

The passenger carrier prohibits firearms in carry-on baggage along with such other items as archery or martial-arts equipment, corrosive chemicals, hoverboards, flammable liquids or gases and sharp objects such as scissors, nail clippers, corkscrews and razors.