Downeaster Ridership Slowly Rising

Ridership of Amtrak’s Downeaster Service has begun rising although it remains far below what would normally be expected at this time of year.

The service had been suspended for two months starting April 13.

One roundtrip between Boston and Brunswick, Maine, resumed on June 15. It carried 250 passengers in its first week of operation.

Patronage in the second week was 375 and 543 in the third week.

In 2019, Downeaster trains handled 2,400 riders on the Friday before Independence Day. This year it was 134.

Patricia Quinn, executive director of the Northern New England Passenger Rail Authority, said ridership is far from robust.

The Authority, which oversee funding and operations of the Downeaster Service, is hoping service will increase by two roundtrips a day in the next few weeks.

Before the pandemic, Downeaster service had been five daily roundtrips.

Despite the low ridership, Quinn said she’s not concerned about the financial viability of the Downeaster in part due to it having received CARES funding.

Although Quinn is heartened by the rising ridership, she acknowledged, “it’s going to be a long time before we get back to the ridership we had before.”

In the meantime, the pandemic has delayed a proposed trial extension of Downeaster Service to Rockland, Maine, via the Coastal Connection.

That trial weekend service would have intermediate stops in Bath, Wiscasset and Newcastle.

It had been slated to begin in 2018 but was delayed due to scheduling and safety issues.

Studies project the Coastal Connection will cost $200,000 and generate about $120,000 in revenue. Ridership was projected at 7,000.

“The Rockland service is not anything that we’re spending much time on right at this minute,” Quinn said.

She said how the tourism industry bounces back from the pandemic will shape the future of the proposed service.

“We’re trying to be cautious and thoughtful about every next step that we take,” Quinn said.

Tags: , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.


%d bloggers like this: