The Art of Black and White Photography

Digital photograph has many advantages but one of the most underused one is the ability to transform an image from color to black and white.

I don’t often see this done and I’m just as guilty as anyone else in not thinking about doing it.

What I have learned, though, is that recognizing when to convert an image from color to black and white is an art in itself.

It works well in situations in which the colors are subdued, often to the point of the image virtually being black and white anyway.

When I was processing this image of Amtrak’s westbound Blue Water at Durand, Michigan, it all but called out for conversion to black and white.

There is strong back lighting from the sun that washed out the color anyway.

Making the image black and white helped to draw out the contrast and enhance the mood.

Train No. 365 is waiting for time. It arrived in Durand a little early and all of the passengers have boarded.

A few onlookers are gathered along the fence waiting to see of a Boy Scout troop that boarded.

The conductor is standing by a vestibule waiting to give a highball and accommodate any late arriving passengers.

Note also the contrast in shapes of the Amfleet and Horizon coaches in the train’s consist, a testament to competing philosophies of passenger car design.

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One Response to “The Art of Black and White Photography”

  1. KellysMail Says:

    Amfleet & Horizon car types contrast. Granted, and it was a bonus Amtrak had the Horizon coaches fill with paying passengers, otherwise to meet the 44 axle minimum, Amtrak would have been using more fuel pulling additional tonnage. Thanks for your colorful emails keeping me abreast of past, current & future Amtrak news. kelly e.

    >

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