Amtrak to Increase Private Car Fees Again

Amtrak has told private car owners that it plans to increase various fees that it charges them to haul and store their cars effective Jan. 1, 2019.

The increases are part of another round of rule changes being implemented by the passenger carrier.

It is the second time in the past eight months that Amtrak has increased its private-car tariffs.

The new rate will become $3.67 per mile, an increase of more than 12 percent from the $3.26 fee imposed on May 1, 2018.

In the past year, Amtrak has increased the cost of hauling a private car 77 cents per mile for an increase of 26 percent.
Overnight parking rates will become $174 per night. They had been $155.

The monthly parking rate at Amtrak terminals will increase to $3,516 per month, up from $3,125.

If another locomotive is added to a train that has added private cars that fee will increase to $5.74 per mile. The previous rate had been $5.10 per mile.

Other charges that Amtrak is imposing include daily locomotive charge of $1,970 and a head end power daily charge of $2,692.

Further, Amtrak said it “reserves the right to change the terms and rates contained herein at any time.”

The carrier did agree to honor the rates contained in a confirmation agreed to before any rate increases go into effect.

In a win for private car owners, Amtrak has restoring Oakland, California, as a connecting point at which cars can connect between the Coast Starlight and the California Zephyr. Making that connection will cost $2,065 per occurrence.

The rule changes slated to go into effect includes a clause that private car owners or the person in charge of a private car shall not offer business courtesies to any Amtrak employee.

This includes such things as “presents, gifts, hospitality, or favor for which fair market value is not paid by the recipient.”

The rules also cite meals, drinks, entertainment, door prizes, and transportation as examples of business courtesies, among any gifts or services with a value greater than $10.

The new guidelines also contain additional details regarding professional conduct, inspection and repair guidelines, and insurance and liability requirements.

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