Signs that Harken to a Past Era of Train Travel

There was a time when every large city in America had one or more “union” stations, meaning depots used by multiple railroads for their passenger service.

There remain quite a few union stations in America, but most of them either are no longer served by passenger trains (e.g., St. Louis) or just see a couple trains a day (e.g., Indianapolis).

Photographs that I’ve seen of these stations back in the days when travel by train was more pervasive than it is now have featured certain types of signs that directed travelers to boarding areas.

Shown are two such types of signs at Chicago Union Station, which is, arguably, the last great train station left in the Heartland of America in terms of frequent use by rail passengers.

The top sign is carved into the masonry work of the station and isn’t going anywhere. The bottom sign, though, is portable and may not longer be in use at CUS.

Both have an old-fashioned quality about them that suggests an era long ago and well before anyone thought there would someday be an Amtrak.

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: