Moorman Looks to Future at Amtrak

Amtrak President Charles “Wick” Moorman has said little in public about his vision for Amtrak since replacing former Amtrak President Joesph Boardman last September.

But Moorman and Amtrak Chairman Anthony Coscia gave a glimpse of the future in an interview with Progressive Railroading.

Amtrak logoCoscia said Amtrak plans to emphasize convincing stakeholders that the passenger carrier serves its passengers well despite having limited resources.

“This is not about being profitable, it’s about being well run,” Coscia said. “It’s about using our resources wisely, and looking for creative and intelligent ways to run the company . . .”

For his part, Moorman told the magazine,  “What we need to do at Amtrak is make sure that we are running an efficient company that provides a great product to the 30-plus million people who use our services every year. If we do that, I think we should be able to answer effectively to anyone on Capitol Hill — or anyone else — who has criticisms about us.”

Moorman said he wants to focus on building a stronger safety culture and then begin working on improving customer service.

He said Amtrak is, “not at the place that the class I carriers are in terms of a safety record and safety culture.”

Customer service may also need some attention. “One of the things we’re going to pay a lot of attention to going forward is the customer experience,” Moorman said. “We’ll balance the customer service needs with our ability to be more efficient and effective, particularly in those areas that don’t directly affect the customer.”

Moorman is activity seeking to recruit new members to his management team, including retired NS executives.

Already, Moorman has discussed with those executives the areas where Amtrak needs improvements.

One former NS manager, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer Mark Manion, has agreed to work with Amtrak.

Moorman also plans to work to improve Amtrak’s relationships with its contract railroads.

Those became strained during a Surface Transportation Board proceeding pertaining to on-time performance standards and regulatory authority.

“The relationships with the class Is are not terrible by any means. I think we can work through a lot of the issues around things like on-time performance,” Moorman said.

“We need to make sure the class Is see us an ally in creating a positive public image; in working on issues that are important to both of us on Capitol Hill; and as a card-carrying member of the railroad industry,” he said.

Moorman will be getting a first-hand look at Amtrak’s service because he rides the Crescent between his home in Charlottesville, Virginia, and his office in Washington.

Although he did not offer any concrete plans for service expansion, Moorman said there are opportunities for expansion, primarily on the state routes.

“I think there will be a ton of opportunity to continue to come our way as the years go by, and we at Amtrak need to be a company that understands that, is prepared for it, and operates that service effectively with our state partners,” he said.

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