AAR Opposes ‘All Stations’ OT Metrics

The Association of American Railroads has told the Surface Transportation Board that it opposes use of “all stations metrics” in setting on-time performance standards for passenger trains.

AAR submitted its comments as part of an STB proceeding that was mandated by federal law.

AARInstead of using an “all stations metric” as Amtrak has proposed, AAR said the STB should use those on-time performance metrics that Amtrak and its host railroads have adopted in their operating agreements, if applicable.

“Switching to an all-stations metric would create false positives for investigation because of the back-loading of recovery time in many of Amtrak’s schedules, in addition to conflicting with the operating agreements,” AAR said. “All-stations OTP (on-time performance) is a deficient metric.”

Amtrak has contended that an all-stations metric is the best way to measure on-time performance.

However, the AAR noted that the passenger carrier did not advocate for an all-stations metric in its operating agreements with the freight railroads even though virtually all of the arguments that Amtrak now makes in its comments to the STB were available when it negotiated those agreements.

The on-time standards that the STB is considering would come into play if a passenger carrier such as Amtrak felt that its trains were consistently being delayed by a host railroad.

Amtrak or another passenger carrier could ask the STB to launch an investigation and sanction a railroad if it was found to have violated the on-time performance standards.

In its comments to the STB, AAR noted that most operating agreements measure on-time performance through arrival at the endpoint of each host’s segment or at specified checkpoints rather than at all intermediate stations.

The AAR comments also noted that contrary to the belief of some, Congress has not adopted the all-stations metric for on-time performance in legislation it has adopted over the years, going back to 1976.

In its comments to the STB, Amtrak said an endpoint metric “ignores the experience’ of Amtrak passengers who disembark at an intermediate station.”

In response, the AAR said Amtrak and its host carriers have long recognized that the on-time performance measures in many of their operating agreements and endpoint OTP both provide strongly correlated indications of overall on-time performance on a route, including performance at intermediate stations.

“And in cases where endpoint on-time performance is satisfactory but all-stations on-time performance is not, the immediate focus should not be a full investigation of all operations for the train, but review and consideration of whether recovery time for that train has been appropriately set for the entire route.”

AAR spokesman Ed Greenberg told Railway Age magazine that the nation’s freight railroads recognize the importance of Amtrak.

“We are committed to a reliable passenger rail service,” he said.  “It is a delicate balance in this country where the majority of passenger rail operates on tracks owned by freight railroads, which means trying to find that right transportation mix of serving the needs of passenger rail while ensuring our industry is continuing to meet the shipping requirements of freight customers in moving the country’s economy. Freight railroads take their contractual obligations seriously and comply with the law.”

Greenberg said on-time performance measurement is complicated involves many factors that are negotiated between Amtrak and its host railroads.

Advertisements

Tags: , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: